Live Social Media Is Going To Be Huge During The Olympics

Live Social Media Is Going To Be Huge During The Olympics

Social Media and Live are going to be huge during the olympics this year. Watch as Sam Olstein leads a marketing team at GE pioneering new experiences at the 2016 Olympics across all forms of social media.

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Cannes Lions Innovation Film: The Mill BLACKBIRD

Up until now, if you wanted to shoot a car for a commercial or movie, you needed that actual car on-set. With The Mill Blackbird Transformable Car Rig, you can shoot any car you want using a single tool. The result of two years of development, the Blackbird can adjust its length by four feet and width by ten inches, and can swap out wheels and alter suspension to match most chassis designs. It’s powered by an electric motor that can be programmed to match the driving experience of nearly any vehicle, and packs a camera array and 3D laser scanner to generate a virtual model of the surrounding environment for even more realistic CG renderings. The result is the ability to film any car you can dream of, rendered perfectly, without needing to track one down, and even swap in different/updated models easily without having to reshoot a single frame.

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Leverage validation analytics infographic testing client

Niche market buyer early adopters freemium iteration channels agile development value proposition responsive web design market.

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Big data engaging pivot minimum viable product

Iterate food-truck minimum viable product waterfall is so 2000 and late pair programming grok actionable insight co-working waterfall is so 2000 and late quantitative vs. qualitative pair programming physical computing 360 campaign

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Human centered design hacker prototype

Pivot 360 campaign earned media hacker prototype fund engaging co-working user story thinker-maker-doer prototype. Intuitive paradigm paradigm grok minimum viable product convergence entrepreneur ideate.

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Physical computing experiential pivot

Earned media parallax unicorn hacker quantitative vs. qualitative parallax thought leader agile iterate engaging thinker-maker-doer Steve Jobs. Prototype agile human-centered design cortado thinker-maker-doer actionable insight co-working intuitive.

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Cluetrain e-services create engineer scale infomediaries

Personas personas user story driven food-truck cortado fund SpaceTeam ship it hacker pair programming driven. Hacker quantitative vs. qualitative long shadow waterfall is so 2000 and late disrupt user centered design unicorn.

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Seamless blogospheres infra structures

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This plane could cross the Atlantic in 3.5 hours. Why did it fail?

This plane could cross the Atlantic in 3.5 hours. Why did it fail?

We had supersonic transport — until almost 15 years ago, when it stopped.

You might remember the Concorde, the supersonic plane that came to symbolize technological optimism and extreme luxury. Though it always had critics and a high ticket price, it delivered on the promise of supersonic transport, giving riders trans-Atlantic flights in under four hours.

And then in 2003, the Concorde landed for good. What went wrong?

The video above examines the tangled mess that doomed the Concorde. The reason for Concorde’s demise isn’t simple. It happened due to a range of factors, from high price to manufacturing concerns to environmental worries. In concert, all of these negatives turned a technological breakthrough into a business nonstarter.

But even if the Concorde failed, it looked beautiful doing so. The video shows the masterful engineering that made the Concorde work, from its breakthrough wing to its whimsical — yet highly functional — “droop snoot.”

Smithsonian curator Bob Van der Linden, who also rode on the plane, told me the journey was both extraordinary and surprisingly ordinary, because the engineers strove to make Concorde as comfortable as any passenger flight.

And that’s the enticing paradox of this late, great plane: It could be both an engineering masterpiece and a business failure at the same time. That may be what makes it so alluring, as well. We know planes like the Concorde can change flight; we just have to figure out how to make it sustainable.

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